The Art of Hubble Spectra The Art of <em>Hubble</em> Spectra

Tim Otto Roth's display of Hubble spectra caught the public's attention. This wasn't what most would expect from an "art show"—instead of static paintings displayed inside a museum, hundreds of laser-painted spectra danced, one after another, across an outside wall of the Maryland Science Center. (A. Nota and K. Sembach)


When Science Drives When Science Drives

Our community of astronomers, despite competing priorities and a challenging budget environment, have the exceptional ability to remain focused on exploiting the facilities we have built or are building, or are planning in order to undertake forefront science. When we scientists let science—not our perceptions of the limitations of technology, policy, or even politics—drive our decision-making, remarkable outcomes are possible. (M. Mountain)


Hubble's Powers of Ten <em>Hubble</em>'s Powers of Ten

On the third anniversary of SM4, here’s an interesting look at a few of Hubble’s milestones. (K. Sembach)


And the Nobel Prize Goes to… And the Nobel Prize Goes to…

The Nobel Prize marks the culmination (so far) of the career of our own Adam Riess.  It could hardly have happened to a nicer guy. (M. Livio)


The New ACS Calibration Pipeline: Putting the Electrons Back Where They Belong The New ACS Calibration Pipeline: Putting the Electrons Back Where They Belong

The Advanced Camera for Surveys team has recently released a new version of the data calibration pipeline, calacs. The new version includes corrections for charge-transfer inefficiency and the electronic artifacts introduced by the repair of the Wide Field Channel during Servicing Mission 4. Users will now see new data products when they retrieve ACS data from the Barbara A. Mikulski Archive at Space Telescope. (L. Smith and the ACS Team)


A Fresh Start for the COS FUV Detector A Fresh Start for the COS FUV Detector

To forestall possible loss in recorded flux due to charge depletion, we plan to change the permanent or “lifetime” position of spectra on the far ultraviolet detector of the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. This change will be accomplished by moving the aperture in the direction across the dispersion. Planned for summer 2012, this fresh start should guarantee the performance of the COS FUV detector for several years. (C. Oliveira, et al.)


STIS Update STIS Update

The Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph is still a significantly used instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope, accounting for 15% of prime General Observer orbits in Cycle 19. We continue to monitor and improve upon the performance of the instrument since its revival in 2009, with two Hubble cycles of monitoring complete since SM4. Here we report on corrections for geometric distortion, time-dependent sensitivity of spectral modes, and dark currents in STIS’s CCD and NUV MAMA. (J. Debes, on behalf of the STIS Team)


Persistence and After-Images in WFC3/IR Data Persistence and After-Images in WFC3/IR Data

Most infrared arrays show after-images, known as persistence, following exposures that significantly saturate the detector. The mercury-cadmium-telluride detectors on the WFC3 IR are no exception. The after-images can last for several hours. Here we describe the nature of persistence in the WFC3/IR detector, and present some strategies for minimizing its effects in the analysis of WFC3/IR images.   (K. Long, S. Baggett, and K. Levay)


Wide Field Camera 3 Update Wide Field Camera 3 Update

The Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) continues to perform well. This article highlights several recent operational and calibration improvements. (J. W. MacKenty)


Webb Status: Out of Replanning and into Implementation <em>Webb</em> Status: Out of Replanning and into Implementation

After major changes in 2011, the Webb project enters 2012 with a new plan. A 2010 independent assessment of the project status, schedule, and budget found several major concerns, and NASA took steps to address each of them.  The project has moved forward and met dozens of milestones in late 2011 and early 2012, reaching many ahead of schedule.  We continue to collect data and user input in order to optimize the science output of Webb. (J. Kalirai and A. Conti)


Introducing NIRISS: A New Science Instrument for Webb Introducing NIRISS: A New Science Instrument for <em>Webb</em>

Last July, the Canadian Space Agency reluctantly decided to discontinue work on the Tunable Filter Imager for Webb.  In its place, CSA is providing a new science instrument that enhances the capabilities of the Webb observatory while also being simpler to build and operate. The reconfigured hardware has been named the Near InfraRed Imager and Slitless Spectrograph.  (R. Doyon and A. Fullerton)


Barbara A. Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes Barbara A. Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes

The Barbara A. Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes is NASA’s data repository for astronomy missions in the ultraviolet–optical wavelength range, including both active and legacy missions. MAST supports the astronomical community by facilitating access to its collections, offering expert user support, and providing software for calibration and analysis. (K. Levay, with contributions from the MAST team)


Hubble Fellowship News Hubble Fellowship News

The Hubble Fellowship Program awards postdoctoral fellowships to candidates of exceptional research promise in astronomy and astrophysics. Now in its 22nd year, its recipients can now be found among the ranks of the faculty at college and university campuses and the professional staff of research institutions across the nation and beyond.  The 22nd annual Hubble Fellows Symposium returned to the Institute this year and was held on March 5–7, 2012. (R. J. Allen)


Webcasting at the Institute Webcasting at the Institute

Webcasting has come a long way in ten years, which is no surprise for an enterprise based on high-performance computers, high-speed networks, and vast information storage.  From the initial barely passable video quality, the Institute will be progressing to high-definition video format later this year. (C. Tullos)


Youth for Astronomy and Engineering Program 2011 Highlights Youth for Astronomy and Engineering Program 2011 Highlights

The Youth for Astronomy and Engineering (YAE) program, in the Community Missions Office at the Institute, develops and organizes fun-filled and engaging programs that succeed in encouraging local area students to explore their interests in astronomy and engineering and, at the same time, explore the wonders of the Universe. (T. Anderson)